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What’s Working and What Isn’t: The Dell Remote Work Experience

The future of work is rapidly approaching, and remote work is becoming a bigger and bigger part of that future. In fact, according to the Gallup poll, remote workers are now almost as common as non-remote workers. As more and more companies begin to adopt a remote-work culture as standard practice, it’s an exciting time for anyone interested in the implications of this shift on the employee experience industry. This blog post dives into some key findings from our 2017 Remote Work Study with Dell, one of the world’s largest manufacturers of PCs and computer servers. Remote work has been part of Dell’s DNA for years – so much so that they were a pioneer in this area.

What’s Working in Dell’s Remote Work Culture?

Dell has been a pioneer in remote work for years. They’ve built an entire culture of remote work, and as a result, there are many positive aspects to their remote work culture. In general, employees feel empowered, have strong relationships with their managers, and have great tools to help them be successful. One of the biggest areas where Dell has seen success with remote work is in retention. They have been able to keep the same employee for an average of five years, which is over three times the industry average. In fact, in some remote locations, employees have been with Dell for over a decade.

The Struggle to Find Good Talent Is Real

One of the biggest issues with remote work that many companies struggle with is finding the right talent. It’s important to be upfront with your hiring process and let candidates know that remote work is a possibility. At Dell, they’ve found that having a centralized hiring team and consistent interview process across the globe has helped to standardize the hiring process. Their hiring team focuses on cultural fit, fit with the team, and technical fit. Another way that Dell has overcome the struggle of finding good talent is by partnering with hiring partners.

What Still Needs Improvement?

At Dell, they’ve found that there are still a few areas that could use improvement. One of the biggest issues they’ve found is with communication. People are still struggling with how to communicate effectively across long distances. Another issue that they’ve discovered is a gap in expectations between managers and employees. Remote workers aren’t always sure what their managers expect of them, and sometimes managers aren’t clear on what they actually want. Another area that Dell is working on improving is culture. Remote work is great in theory, but it can be challenging to implement if there isn’t a consistent culture across the globe.

The Importance of Culture in a Remote Workplace

Remote work is amazing for many reasons, but it’s important to remember that it isn’t a cure-all. It can create new problems when it doesn’t exist within a strong overarching culture. For example, most remote workers are self-disciplined, but a remote culture can still help create structure where there might otherwise be none. A remote culture can also help smooth out any kinks in the hiring or onboarding process, as well as help hire strong, self-disciplined people who might otherwise be left out of the hiring process based on their location.

Key Takeaway

The future of work is rapidly approaching, and remote work is becoming a bigger and bigger part of that future. In fact, according to the Gallup poll, remote workers are now almost as common as non-remote workers. Dell has been a pioneer in remote work for years. They’ve built an entire culture of remote work, and as a result, there are many positive aspects to their remote work culture. In general, employees feel empowered, have strong relationships with their managers, and have great tools to help them be successful.

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